hour

English

Alternative forms

  • hower, houre, howre (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle  hourehouroure, from Anglo-Norman houre, from Old  houre, (h)ore, from  hōra (“hour”), from Ancient  ὥρα (hṓra, “any time or period, whether of the year, month, or day”), from Proto-Indo-European *yeh₁- (“year, season”). Akin to Old  ġēar (“year”). Doublet of hora.

Displaced native Middle  stunde, stound (“hour, moment, stound”) (from Old  stund (“hour, time, moment”)), Middle  ȝetid, tid (“hour, time”) from Old  *ġetīd, compare Old Saxon getīd (“hour, time”).

Noun

(plural hours)

  1. A time period of sixty minutes; one twenty-fourth of a day. spent an hour at lunch.
  2. A season, moment, or time.
  3. (poetic) The time. The hour grows late and I must go home.
  4. (military, in the plural) Used after a two-digit hour and a two-digit minute to indicate time.
  5. (Christianity, in the plural) The set times of prayer, the canonical hours, the offices or services prescribed for these, or a book containing them.
  6. (chiefly US) A distance that can be traveled in one hour. This place is an hour away from where I live.

Synonyms

  • (period of sixty minutes, a season or moment): stound (obsolete)

Derived terms

  • ampere-hour
  • blue hour
  • canonical hour
  • half an hour
  • half-hour
  • happy hour
  • on the hour
  • person-hour
  • planetary hour

Anagrams

  • rohu

Middle English

Etymology 1

Noun

  1. Alternative form of houre

Etymology 2

Determiner

  1. Alternative form of oure

Etymology 3

Determiner

  1. Alternative form of your