English

Proboscis bat

The proboscis bat (Rhynchonycteris naso) is a bat species from South and Central America. Other common names include Long-nosed proboscis bat, sharp-nosed bat, Brazilian long-nosed bat and river bat in English, and murciélago narizón in Spanish. It is monotypic within its genus.

Gordon Bradley

Gordon Bradley (23 November 1933 – 29 April 2008) was an English-American soccer midfielder born and raised on Wearside who played several seasons with lower-division English clubs before moving to play in Canada at the age of 30. During the Canadian off-season, he played and coached in the U.S.-based German American Soccer League. In 1971, …

Gordon Bradley Read More »

Amanda (2018 film)

Amanda is a 2018 French drama film directed by Mikhaël Hers. Plot Living in Paris, 24-year-old David is close to his sister Sandrine – a single mother – and her seven-year-old daughter, Amanda. Sandrine is an English teacher, while David looks after holiday lets and is a part-time gardener. He meets Lena, a piano teacher. …

Amanda (2018 film) Read More »

hour

English Alternative forms hower, houre, howre (obsolete) Etymology From Middle English houre, hour, oure, from Anglo-Norman houre, from Old French houre, (h)ore, from Latin hōra (“hour”), from Ancient Greek ὥρα (hṓra, “any time or period, whether of the year, month, or day”), from Proto-Indo-European *yeh₁- (“year, season”). Akin to Old English ġēar (“year”). Doublet of hora. Displaced native Middle English stunde, stound (“hour, moment, stound”) (from Old English stund (“hour, time, moment”)), Middle English ȝetid, tid (“hour, time”) from Old English *ġetīd, compare Old Saxon getīd (“hour, time”). Noun (plural hours) A time period of sixty minutes; one twenty-fourth of a day. spent …

hour Read More »

hours

English Noun plural of hour Anagrams Horus, Roush, rohus

blow the whistle

English Etymology When used idiomatically, probably an allusion to a police officer blowing his or her whistle on observing a violation of the law. Verb blow the whistle (third-person singular simple present blows the whistle, present participle blowing the whistle, simple past blew the whistle, past participle blown the whistle) (idiomatic, usually with “on”) To disclose information to the public or to appropriate authorities concerning the illegal or socially harmful actions of a person or group, especially a corporation or government agency. In some jurisdictions, it is illegal …

blow the whistle Read More »

poid

English Noun poid (plural poids) The curve traced by the center of a sphere when it rolls or slides over a surface having a sinusoidal profile. References IEEE 100-2000, The Authoritative Dictionary of IEEE Standards Terms, Seventh Edition, IEEE, 2000 Anagrams Diop, iPod

Maze (2000 film)

Maze is a 2000 romance film about a New York painter and sculptor—Lyle Maze (Rob Morrow)—with Tourette syndrome (TS) and obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD), who falls in love with Callie (Laura Linney), the pregnant girlfriend of Maze’s best friend Mike (Craig Sheffer) while Mike is away on a long stay in Africa as a doctor. Directed by Rob Morrow Screenplay by Nicole …

Maze (2000 film) Read More »

In Pursuit of Honor

In Pursuit of Honor is a 1995 American made-for-cable Western film directed by Ken Olin. Don Johnson stars as a member of a United States Cavalry detachment refusing to slaughter its horses after being ordered to do so by General Douglas MacArthur. The movie follows the plight of the officers as they attempt to save the animals that the Army no longer needs …

In Pursuit of Honor Read More »

John Glen (director)

Born 15 May 1932 (age 89)Sunbury-on-Thames, England Occupation Film director, Film editor Years active 1948–2015 John Glen is an English retired film director and editor. He is best known for his work on the James Bond series, editing the films On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, The Spy Who Loved Me, and Moonraker, and directing the films For Your Eyes Only , Octopussy, A View to a Kill, The …

John Glen (director) Read More »

Roger Moore

Sir Roger George Moore KBE was an English stage and screen actor. He was the third actor to play fictional British spy James Bond in the Eon Productions film series, appearing in seven feature films between 1973 and 1985. Moore has made the most appearances as Bond, from Live and Let Die through A View …

Roger Moore Read More »

Hippie

A hippie, also spelled hippy, especially in UK English, was a member of the counterculture of the 1960s, originally a youth movement that began in the United States during the mid-1960s and spread to other countries around the world. The word hippie came from hipster and was used to describe beatniks who moved into New York City’s Greenwich Village, San Francisco’s Haight-Ashbury district, and Chicago’s Old Town community. The term hippie was used …

Hippie Read More »

Celtic Sea

The Celtic Sea is the area of the Atlantic Ocean off the south coast of Ireland bounded to the east by Saint George’s Channel; other limits include the Bristol Channel, the English Channel, and the Bay of Biscay, as well as adjacent portions of Wales, Cornwall, and Brittany. The southern and western boundaries are delimited by the continental shelf, which drops away sharply. The Isles of Scilly are an archipelago of small islands in …

Celtic Sea Read More »

County seat

A county seat is an administrative center, seat of government, or capital city of a county or civil parish. The term is used in Canada, China, Hungary, Romania, and the United States. The equivalent term shire town is used in the U.S. state of Vermont and in some other English-speaking jurisdictions. County towns have a similar function in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, as well as historically …

County seat Read More »

England

England is a country that is a constituent of the United Kingdom. It is bordered by Wales to the west and Scotland to the north. The Irish Sea is located northwest of England, and the Celtic Sea is located southwest. The North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south divide England …

England Read More »

Delaware

Delaware is a state in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States, bordering Maryland to its south and west; Pennsylvania to its north; and New Jersey and the Atlantic Ocean to its east. The state takes its name from the nearby Delaware River named after Thomas West, 3rd Baron De La Warr, an English nobleman and Virginia‘s first colonial governor.

Maryland

Maryland is a state in the Mid-Atlantic and Southern regions of the United States, bordering Virginia, West Virginia, and the District of Columbia to its south and west; Pennsylvania to its north; and Delaware and the Atlantic Ocean to its east. Baltimore is the largest city in the state, and the capital is Annapolis. Among its occasional nicknames are Old Line State, the Free State, and the Chesapeake Bay State. It is named after the English Queen Henrietta Maria, known in …

Maryland Read More »

Nicaragua

Nicaragua, officially the Republic of Nicaragua, is the largest country in the Central American isthmus, bordered by Honduras to the northwest, the Caribbean to the east, Costa Rica to the south, and the Pacific Ocean to the southwest. Managua is the country’s capital and largest city and is also the third-largest city in Central America, behind Tegucigalpa and Guatemala City. The multi-ethnic population of six million includes people of indigenous, European, African, …

Nicaragua Read More »

Light fixture

A light fixture (US English), light fitting (UK English), or luminaire is an electrical device containing an electric lamp that provides illumination. All light fixtures have a fixture body and one or more lamps. The lamps may be in sockets for easy replacement—or, in the case of some LED fixtures, hard-wired in place. Fixtures may also have a switch to control the light, either attached to …

Light fixture Read More »

Turing completeness

In computability theory, a system of data-manipulation rules is said to be Turing-complete or computationally universal if it can be used to simulate any Turing machine. This means that this system is able to recognize or decide other data-manipulation rule sets. Turing completeness is used as a way to express the power of such a data-manipulation rule set. Virtually all programming …

Turing completeness Read More »

Analytical Engine

The Analytical Engine was a proposed mechanical general-purpose computer designed by English mathematician and computer pioneer Charles Babbage. It was first described in 1837 as the successor to Babbage’s difference engine, which was a design for a simpler mechanical computer. The Analytical Engine incorporated an arithmetic logic unit, control flow in the form of conditional branching and loops, and integrated memory, making it the first design for a …

Analytical Engine Read More »

United Kingdom

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country in north-western Europe, off the north-­western coast of the European mainland. The United Kingdom includes the island of Great Britain, the north-­eastern part of the island of Ireland, and many smaller islands within the British Isles. Northern Ireland shares a land border with the Republic of …

United Kingdom Read More »

Svalutation

Svalutation is the 16th album by Italian singer Adriano Celentano, issued in 1976. The word “svalutation” is a mock Englishword coined after the Italian”svalutazione”, which correctly translates to “devaluation”, and the title track ironizes on the Italian economical and political crisis of the time. Released 1976 Genre Pop music Length 34:04 Label Clan Celentano Producer Clan Celentano The album …

Svalutation Read More »